Sunday, April 25, 2010

Cycling across pedestrain crossings: Is it legal?

Below is an excerpt from a parliamentary debate held on 19-10-2009


WRITTEN ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS

TRAFFIC OFFENCES AMONG CYCLISTS

1. Dr Lim Wee Kiak asked the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Home Affairs (a) how many cyclists have been booked for traffic offences over the past 12 months; (b) what are the common offences; and (c) what is the rule for vehicular traffic when cyclists ride their bicycles across pedestrian crossings.

Mr Wong Kan Seng:

1,312 summonses were issued to errant cyclists for cycling offences between July 2008 and June 2009. Of these, the largest number of 615 summonses were issued to cyclists for cycling on the footways of roads. Other common infringements include failing to ride in an orderly manner such as not keeping a proper lookout and not giving way to traffic with the right of way, riding on expressways and riding against the flow of traffic.

Cyclists are not prohibited from riding across pedestrian crossings but must do so in a safe and orderly manner. Those who do not and cause danger to others commit an offence under Rule 10 of the Road Traffic (Bicycles) Rules and are liable to pay a composition fine. If they ride in a rash or negligent manner that endangers life, or in a manner that is likely to cause hurt or injury to others, they can be prosecuted under Section 279 of the Penal Code. If convicted, they can be fined up to $5,000 or imprisoned up to one year, or both.

When approaching pedestrian crossings, a driver is required to keep a proper lookout for other road users, slow down and proceed at such a speed which will enable him to stop his vehicle before reaching the crossing. Failure to do so may result in the driver being liable for a fine of up to $1,000, or imprisonment for a term of up to three months under Section 131 of the Road Traffic Act.

Source: http://www.parliament.gov.sg/reports/public/hansard/full/20091019/20091019_HR.html


Now the only problem with this is that its illegal to cycle on the pavement. Sometimes laws can be damn confusing. But then again, this reply is by Wong Kan Seng, you know, the guy with the million dollar salary who wasn't held accountable for Mas Selamat's escape and lost all respect from Singaporeans.

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